Census Links is a growing catalog of links to transcriptions of census, tax lists, birth, death, marriage and military records, all freely available to help with your genealogy research.

 


  • Free Census Extraction Forms from Ancestry.com
    Census extraction forms are doubly valuable: not only do they allow researchers to see the format and column headings for various census years (especially if the schedules themselves are hard to read), they also provide a clean and convenient method for extracting and filing important information you find.


    Clues in Census Records, 1790-1840
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. Although the first six federal decennial censuses taken from 1790 through 1840 contain less data than those taken later, they still contain useful clues that should not be overlooked.


    Clues in Census Records, 1850-1930
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. This article describes some of the clues found in census records.


    The UsGenWeb Project
    The USGenWeb Project consists of a group of volunteers working together to provide Internet websites for genealogical research in every county and every state of the United States. The Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free access for everyone.

    Rootsweb
    RootsWeb.com is a thriving, free genealogy community on the web, providing a robust worldwide environment for learning, collaborating and sharing for the expert and novice alike.


  • NARAtions - The Blog of the National Archives
    • Introducing the Updated National Archives Catalog
      Today, the National Archives will roll out the new, updated National Archives Catalog. For over a year, NARA staff worked with the firm Search Technologies to design and develop a robust catalog that will facilitate the Agency’s big, hairy, audacious goal to Make Access Happen. While at first glance, it doesn’t look much different from […]
    • Our National History and You
      Today’s post comes from Markus Most, Director of the Digitization Division at the National Archives. Here at the National Archives, we’re working on a new, cross-office project to make accessible audiovisual records of World War I and World War II. We are digitizing public domain films and photographs so that they will be available for […]
    • New Digitization Strategy now available
      Today’s post comes from Markus Most, Director of the Digitization Division at the National Archives. Based on your input, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has revised its digitization strategy, and we are once again asking for your feedback! The National Archives 2014-2018 Strategic Plan puts forth a bold vision for NARA in providing […]
    • Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) and Imgur “Summer of Archives” Collaboration Gets By With a Little Help From NARA
      Today’s post comes from Larry Shockley, student intern in the National Archives’ Digital Public Access Branch On June 2, 2014, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) announced a partnership with Imgur called the “Summer of Archives.” This joint project is designed to combine historical images with modern technology in order to give new life […]
    • Relocation of Personnel Records to National Archives at St. Louis
      Today’s post comes from Tim Enas, Chief of Textual Accessioning at the National Archives at College Park. Staff at the National Archives at College Park are moving approximately 315 cubic feet of personnel related records to the National Archives at St. Louis.  The series being transferred complement the mission, function, and holdings of the National […]