Census Links is a growing catalog of links to transcriptions of census, tax lists, birth, death, marriage and military records, all freely available to help with your genealogy research.

 


  • Free Census Extraction Forms from Ancestry.com
    Census extraction forms are doubly valuable: not only do they allow researchers to see the format and column headings for various census years (especially if the schedules themselves are hard to read), they also provide a clean and convenient method for extracting and filing important information you find.


    Clues in Census Records, 1790-1840
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. Although the first six federal decennial censuses taken from 1790 through 1840 contain less data than those taken later, they still contain useful clues that should not be overlooked.


    Clues in Census Records, 1850-1930
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. This article describes some of the clues found in census records.


    The UsGenWeb Project
    The USGenWeb Project consists of a group of volunteers working together to provide Internet websites for genealogical research in every county and every state of the United States. The Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free access for everyone.

    Rootsweb
    RootsWeb.com is a thriving, free genealogy community on the web, providing a robust worldwide environment for learning, collaborating and sharing for the expert and novice alike.


  • NARAtions - The Blog of the National Archives
    • Have Your Say: Open Government at the Archives!
      It’s that time again! We are developing the agency’s third Open Government Plan and we need your suggestions for 2014-2016. Take a look at our overview of proposed actions for this plan and our previous plan and tell us what you would like to see included. How do you think we should further transparency, participation, and […]
    • Calling Citizen Archivists to Crowdsource Video Captions!
      One of the chief goals of the National Archives is making our records- regardless of format- more accessible.  Sometimes this means digitizing records and adding them to our catalog, but it also means creating ways for all US citizens to experience our collections.  Accessibility of videos for the hearing impaired is very important to us, […]
    • Have Your Say: Open more data!
      This post comes from Doug Ward in Information Services and Meredith Stewart in the Office of Innovation. The Open Data Policy states what we already know really well here at NARA —  information is a valuable national resource and a strategic asset to the Federal Government, its partners, and the public. We see this in […]
    • Ski jumping into our Olympic Archives
      Guest blogger Elizabeth Lieutenant, a Master’s student in Library and Information Science at The Catholic University of America, is a virtual intern in the Office of Innovation. Here at the National Archives, we’ve been busy watching the Olympics and rooting for Team U.S.A. All the excitement of watching snowboarders fly through the air and figure […]
    • President’s Day at the National Archives
      Guest blogger Elizabeth Lieutenant, a Master’s student in Library and Information Science at The Catholic University of America, is a virtual intern in the Office of Innovation. This week we celebrated President’s Day, a U.S. federal holiday that officially honors George Washington’s birthday. While the holiday may be for George, we at the National Archives […]