Census Links is a growing catalog of links to transcriptions of census, tax lists, birth, death, marriage and military records, all freely available to help with your genealogy research.

 


  • Free Census Extraction Forms from Ancestry.com
    Census extraction forms are doubly valuable: not only do they allow researchers to see the format and column headings for various census years (especially if the schedules themselves are hard to read), they also provide a clean and convenient method for extracting and filing important information you find.


    Clues in Census Records, 1790-1840
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. Although the first six federal decennial censuses taken from 1790 through 1840 contain less data than those taken later, they still contain useful clues that should not be overlooked.


    Clues in Census Records, 1850-1930
    Experienced genealogical researchers use clues found in one record to find other records about the same individual. This article describes some of the clues found in census records.


    The UsGenWeb Project
    The USGenWeb Project consists of a group of volunteers working together to provide Internet websites for genealogical research in every county and every state of the United States. The Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free access for everyone.

    Rootsweb
    RootsWeb.com is a thriving, free genealogy community on the web, providing a robust worldwide environment for learning, collaborating and sharing for the expert and novice alike.


  • NARAtions - The Blog of the National Archives
    • Navy Maritime Reference Roundtable
      Join us on Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 11:00 am for our next Reference Roundtable session on Navy and Maritime related records.  The session will be held in room G-25 at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Learn from the experts who work with the records! We will be discussing new searching tools and […]
    • What Are You Working On, Jessica Sims?
      Ever wonder what exciting new projects the many employees at NARA are working on? The “What are You Working On?” blog feature aims to introduce a variety of NARA employees and highlight some of the exciting projects we are working on around the agency. What is your name and title? Jessica Sims (I go by […]
    • Transcribe #1000pages for Sunshine Week
      NARA is excited to participate in Government-wide Sunshine Week activities by launching our first Transcription Challenge in the National Archives Catalog! Here at the Archives, we like to say that there is a story in every box. Help us unlock those stories by transcribing the digitized records in the catalog.  Our goal this week is […]
    • @ThisisArchives staff Twitter account
      Are you interested in learning more about the many different projects and employees at the National Archives? We are excited to introduce a new staff-run Twitter account: @ThisisArchives! Each week, a different National Archives employee will take a turn on Twitter, sharing details about our profession, projects we are working on, and what it’s like to […]
    • What’s New On Amara?
      Last March we introduced you to our new crowdsource video caption tool, Amara. This neat tool allows anyone with an interest in transcribing our motion picture collection to join our team and start typing what you hear! After the captioning is done in Amara, the captions are transferred back to YouTube, making our holdings accessible […]